SERIOUSLY? Michelle Obama ignores dress code, wears revealing outfit inside Italian church


Michelle Obama's top

Former President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama are in Italy vacationing, and the former First Lady is making headlines for her odd fashion choices, which some are calling disrespectful.


President Obama and Michelle Obama are currently in Tuscany, and earlier today, visited the Siena Cathedral (Duomo di Siena), a medieval church originally built in the twelfth century. While visiting the cathedral, Michelle was spotted wearing what the Daily Mail described as a “flirty, shoulder-bearing top.”

Many are calling Michelle Obama’s top disrespectful, and unsuitable to be worn inside a church. In fact, the church actually has a dress code, and it forbids this sort of attire. Jim Hoft of The Gateway Pundit actually discovered this little tidbit with some simple research, something Michelle Obama’s staff failed to do before her visit. Assuming, of course, that Michelle didn’t openly defy the rule herself.

From the cathedral’s own website:

Q. What is the dress code for visiting the cathedral?
A. No bare shoulders and no skirts or shorts above the knee
Same as any other church in Italy, no bare shoulders and no skirts or shorts above the knee.

Here are photos of Michelle Obama’s top. Judge for yourself.

Michelle Obama's top

Michelle Obama's top

Here is video of Barack and Michelle leaving the cathedral.

It should also be noted that six American fighter jets accompanied the former President’s flight to Italy, leaving a huge carbon footprint on the environment and costing taxpayers untold millions.

What do you think of Michelle Obama’s top? Was it too revealing for a church? Let us know in the comments, and in addition, share this on social media.

Save

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.