What would the solar system look like if the moon were the size of one pixel?


moon-1-pixel-thumb

Someone (based on the url I’m guessing a dude name Josh Worth) created a website that is basically a to scale “model” of the solar system on the basis that the moon is the size of 1 pixel.

After scrolling on my phone for what felt like forever I was curious to know how much distance this website would cover if it were to exist outside of cyberspace (does anyone even call it that anymore?)…

Luckily Mr. Worth gives us several metrics to measure the distance, and one of them is pixels (yay for me because light minutes  – the default metric – would’ve been a little tougher). The entire distance from the Sun to Pluto is 1,700,289 pixels. On a monitor that is 1600 x 900 pixels it would take about 1,063 screenshots. If you wanted to print those screenshots on paper at 300 dots per inch (the standard resolution for printing stuff) it would be 5667.28 inches, or over 472 feet long.

Other potentially interesting things to note:

  • It takes about 328.5 light minutes for light from the sun to reach Pluto, for us its about 8-9 minutes. So, if we were to build a space craft that can travel at the speed of light it would take that craft almost the same amount of time to reach Pluto as it takes a plane to fly non-stop from Los Angeles to New York.
  • Mars would be a 4 minute trip at light speed.
  • We are 11,888 Earths away from the Sun.
  • It’s noted in the model that the distances from Mars to Jupiter is about 3 times the distance from the Sun to Mars.
  • I apparently really needed a break from politics!

Below are some screenshots (click to enlarge) or just go check it out for yourself. It’s fun to kind of get lost in it.

moon-1-pixel-1 moon-1-pixel-2 moon-1-pixel-3

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