WIKILEAKS EXPOSES Google’s Secret Plan to Help Hillary’s Campaign


Google

Google

Remember all those stories about Google changing search results about Hillary Clinton to make them more positive? Now we know why: the chairman for Google’s parent company secretly offered his services to the Hillary campaign. He even offered to create features on Google to assist the Democratic nominee.

In an email from John Podesta to Cheryl Mills (shown below) from 2014 and just released by WikiLeaks, the head of Google’s parent company was eager to help Hillary get elected.

The Daily Caller outlines the exchange:

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google’s parent company Alphabet, wanted to be “head outside advisor” to the Hillary Clinton campaign, according to Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta in an email released by WikiLeaks.

WikiLeaks has continued to reveal Schmidt’s cozy relationship with the Clinton campaign. In a previously leaked email, a memo showed that Schmidt was working directly with the Clinton campaign on setting up various backend features to their website.

“I met with Eric Schmidt tonight. As David reported, he’s ready to fund, advise recruit talent, etc. Clearly wants to be head outside advisor, but didn’t seem like he wanted to push others out,” Podesta wrote. He added, “Clearly wants to get going. He’s still in DC tomorrow and would like to meet with you if you are in DC in the afternoon. I think it’s worth doing. You around? If you are, and want to meet with him, maybe the four of us can get on the phone iN the am.”

Here’s the email in question (which can be seen in full here):

Google


 *** Please share this page on Facebook, Twitter, Email and other social media with the share tools on this page because OUR voice is YOUR voice! ***

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.