Trump Responds to North Korea Offer to GIVE UP Nuclear Weapons


President Donald Trump has responded to North Korea’s offer to negotiate an end to its nuclear weapons program, and impose a moratorium on nuclear and missile tests during those negotiations.

The offer by North Korea is the first concession made by the Hermit Kingdom since President Trump took office, and could signal a major shift in international negotiations.


North Korea’s offer was made to a senior South Korean official visiting the country in the wake of the Olympics. The games seemed to thaw relations between the two countries, but North Korea had made no indication it was willing to end its pursuit of arming a nuclear missile. Until now.

In response to the North Korean offer, President Trump sent out a hopeful tweet (included below). “Possible progress being made in talks with North Korea. For the first time in many years, a serious effort is being made by all parties concerned. The World is watching and waiting! May be false hope, but the U.S. is ready to go hard in either direction,” he said.

The Associated Press has more.

North Korean leader Kim Jung Un has expressed a willingness to discuss nuclear disarmament with the United States and impose a moratorium on nuclear and missile tests during such talks, a senior South Korean official said Tuesday after returning from the North.

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Kim also agreed to meet with South Korea’s president at a tense border village in late April, presidential national security director Chung Eui-yong said after talks with Kim in Pyongyang, North Korea’s capital.

North Korea’s reported willingness to hold a “candid dialogue” with the United States to discuss denuclearization and establish diplomatic relations follows a year of increased fears of war on the Korean Peninsula, with Kim and U.S. President Donald Trump exchanging fiery rhetoric and crude insults over Kim’s barrage of weapons tests.

The Trump administration also pushed through some of the harshest sanctions the already hugely sanctioned North has yet faced.

Trump tweeted Tuesday that “possible progress” was being made in the talks with North Korea, and that all sides were making serious efforts. He added: “May be false hope, but the U.S. is ready to go hard in either direction!”

There is still skepticism whether the developments will help establish genuine peace between the Koreas, which have a long history of failing to follow through with major rapprochement agreements. The United States has made it clear that it doesn’t want empty talks with North Korea and that all options, including military measures, remain on the table.

The North has repeatedly said in the past that it won’t negotiate over its nuclear program and vowed to bolster its nuclear and missile arsenals. Its apparent about-face might be an attempt to win concessions as its economy struggles under the weight of sanctions, some analysts said, or a way to buy time to better develop nuclear missiles targeting the mainland United States.

Many experts believe North Korea won’t easily give up a nuclear program that it has doggedly developed, despite years of escalating international pressure, to cope with what it claims is U.S. hostility.

Chung led a 10-member South Korean delegation on a two-day visit to North Korea. They were the first South Korean officials to meet the young North Korean leader since he took power after his dictator father’s death in late 2011. Chung’s trip also was the first known high-level visit by South Korean officials to North Korea in about 11 years.

Here is the President’s tweet.

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