VEGAS BOMBSHELL: 17 Ambulances at Hooters, Witnesses Say Multiple Shooters and Locations [NEW VIDEO]


las vegas shooting video hooters ambulances

Editor’s Note: Silence Is Consent has been unable to verify the videos in this story as authentic. We include them here only to provide readers with all the information available. We strongly suggest readers take the authenticity into consideration upon viewing, and draw your own conclusions.

*Update 10/23: Reader Feedback has provided a good point, which may explain the video. Hooter’s may have been the staging area for ambulances responding to the shooting. While the video quality is not good enough to give us an idea of what is happening, this is an important possibility to consider.

A video circulating online raises more questions about the events surrounding the October 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas. In particular, it raises the possibility of a second shooting and even more victims.

“They are just pulling so many bodies out of that Hooter’s,” a man’s voice can be heard saying at the 24-second mark in the video below. “I don’t know if people are dead—I don’t know if people are just injured—they just keep pulling them out though…”


Ever since the Mandalay Bay Massacre took place, questions have surrounded the mainstream narrative. Who was this “security guard” that changed his official story over three times? Where were the thousands of rounds that the shooter supposedly fired off? …and most important, why does video evidence suggest more than one shooter?

Video upon video has been released, discrediting the mainstream narrative—yet one video, released by a man who was on the scene when the shooting took place, puts the entire case to rest. In footage released by popular YouTuber Benjamin Franks, a caravan of ambulances can be seen pulling bodies out of Hooters, miles away from the shooting.

Franks hadn’t intended to capture the footage—in fact, he’d probably intended to have a rather relaxing night. After seeing ambulance after ambulance pull into Hooters, pick up bodies, and leave off to somewhere else, however, he thought it was important enough to film.

“It all must have happened at Hooters dude because they are all showing up there,” he said. “It looks like most of them are at Hooters.”

Shepard Ambellas, an activist, journalist, filmmaker, and radio talk show host, reports:

LAS VEGAS (INTELLIHUB) — On the night of October 1, Youtuber Benjamin Franks and his friend had just grabbed some tacos and were heading back to their hotel room at the MGM when they noticed a separate disturbance at the corner of Las Vegas Blvd and Tropicana Ave.

Fifteen-minutes later, from the leisure of his hotel room, Franks managed to capture bombshell video footage which shows a total of 17 ambulances removing human bodies from Hooters, contradicting the official story told by Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo.

“They are just pulling so many bodies out of that Hooters,” a man’s voice can be heard saying at the 24-second mark. “I don’t know if people are dead — I don’t know if people are just injured — they just keep pullin’ them out though […] something definitely happened at Hooters though.”

The videos don’t stop here, though—what’s terrifying is that there’s been actual footage captured from inside of Hooters after the shooting, and shows what appears to be human bodies covered with towels and sheets. The man filming sounds visibly distressed, and can be heard screaming that there’s “bodies just everywhere.”

In this day in age of technology, the truth cannot be snuffed out. On every street corner, in every hotel, in every single casino, and by every single slot machine, there was a man with a phone, ready to record the events about to unfold. If the video is authentic, it changes what we know about the Las Vegas Massacre.

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